Do You Consider Yourself a Caregiver?

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Do You Consider Yourself a Caregiver?

The general definition of a caregiver is a family member or paid aid who regularly looks after a child, a spouse, a sick or elderly family member, or disabled person. It also applies to caring for a loved one with a mental health condition.
Have you called the police asking for a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) officer to deescalate a highly elevated situation? Have you taken time off work because of your loved one’s behavior ? Have you had to abruptly change dinner, weekend or vacation plans? Have you avoided interacting with other family members or neighbors because of your loved one’s challenges? Have you neglected your own health, interests, hobbies, or friends? These are all situations that can occur when you are a caregiver. Do you see yourself here?
Possibly you’ve been a caregiver for years or perhaps you’re new to caring for your loved one. In either case, caregiving takes a toll. It has nothing to do with how much you love your family member. The emotional, physical, and financial dimensions of caregiving are stressful.
When your loved one is taking medication regularly, going to counseling, or simply living a peace-filled life, all is well with the world. Conversely, when none of that—or only some of that—is happening you tend to be in the “eye of the hurricane” or you’re waiting on “the other shoe to drop.” If your loved is a minor who lives with you, you have one contact advantage caregivers of adults do not share. You have legal permission to discuss treatment, medication, and other aspects of ta minor’s care. Please don’t take this for granted. Use every avenue you have to talk about your child’s illness and paths to recovery. If you are the caregiver of an adult, you may have that privilege with your loved one’s permission or you may not. Periodically, ask your loved one for his or her permission to share their history. You don’t want to “spy” on them; you simply want to be their partner in recovery.
Statistics show that caregivers have higher levels of depression than non-caregivers. And women caregivers are more susceptible to increased stress,anxiety, exhaustion, depression, and poor physical health. More than one-third of caregivers provide continuing care to others even while in poor health themselves.

Upcoming Events

  • NAMI Connection Recovery Support Group VIA Zoom-November 14,2020
  • NAMI Connection Recovery Support Group VIA Zoom-November 14,2020
  • NAMI Connection Recovery Support Group VIA Zoom-November 14,2020
  • NAMI Connection Recovery Support Group VIA Zoom-November 14,2020
  • NAMI Connection Recovery Support Group VIA Zoom-November 14,2020
  • NAMI Connection Recovery Support Group VIA Zoom-November 14,2020
  • NAMI Connection Recovery Support Group VIA Zoom-November 14,2020
  • NAMI Connection Recovery Support Group VIA Zoom-November 14,2020
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Do You Consider Yourself A Caregiver?

Do You Consider Yourself A Caregiver?

Do You Consider Yourself A Caregiver?

Donate to NAMI

Make A Donation

Your contribution allows us to answer calls from people in need and provide free services to individuals and familes affected by mental illness in Franklin County

Sign Up For our Mailing list

Get updates and special event notification straight to your inbox

BECOME A MEMBER

GET INVOLVED

GET IN TOUCH